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Mr Khan, keep your Naya Pakistan to yourself

Taking in consideration everything the country has been through in only the first year of Khan, it does not take a lot for one to conclude that Pakistan is going through the worst. Thank God our prime minister is handsome, though.

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Imran Khan

Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PMLN’s) leader Rana Sanaullah’s arrest only serves as one more barrier cleared for Prime Minister Imran Khan’s smooth sailing through. While the country’s economy is in shackles, inflation is out of control, and the rupee can’t find a slab to stand on, Khan has found himself weirdly obsessed with the idea of clearing the parliament of any opposing voices.

One can almost argue in favor of the many arrests that have taken place in the last couple of months as to be in line with the pre-poll promises Khan made to the public, but at what cost? Plus, there is always the genuine argument of selected accountability. If Khan is actually loyal to the justice that he has been preaching for so long then how come dictator Perez Musharraf gets a free pass? Khan’s failure to contain the army’s growing influence in the country’s very garment has also raised a lot of eyebrows. All in all, one has to ask the question: Is this the change Khan promised us?

Crippling Economy

The first annual budget unveiled by the ruling Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) was almost scrapped apart in the parliament for its “anti-poor” nature as described by the opposition voices. The opposition further threatened the government with protests in and out of the parliament over perceived, and liable, mismanagement by the government.

The Pakistan Economic Survey, a government-issued report that precedes the annual budget presentation, showed that almost all financial indicators have seen a downward trend. The country’s growth rate fell by almost 50 percent from 6.2 to 3.3 percent and is expected to dive to at least 2.4 percent by next year. The national rupee has lost a fifth of its value against the dollar since the beginning of the fiscal year and still cannot be predicted to halt any time soon. Inflation, on the other hand, is hovering at shocking figures of 13 percent and can rise even more by the end of year.

Khan’s dismissal of his once-favorite Asad Umer only highlights the severity of the issue that the government has tried so well to downplay. And let us not forget the ever-increasing debt of the country, which now eats up some 30 percent of the budget every year.

Selected Accountability

In an almost comical scene at the parliament a week earlier, the speaker of the National Assembly, banned the word ‘selected’ from being said when addressing the honorable Prime Minister Khan. This led to a protest followed by the clever use of alternates of the banned word, thoroughly focused on, by the opposition. Although it is wrong to call a sitting prime minister ‘selected,’ Khan has surely earned it.

A massive crackdown that followed the arrests of the major opposition voices including the opposition leader Shehbaz Sharif, Pakistan People Party (PPP’s) chairman Asif Ali Zardari, and PMLN lawmakers Khawaja Asif and Saad Rafique have only allowed the idea of targeted accountability to be born.

The lookers of Khan’s style of justice question why Khan’s ever-increasing arm on opposition hasn’t reached the neck of dictator Musharraf yet who’s currently on the run from the many cases registered against him in the courts of law. Khan’s government, much like previous governments, has shown absolutely no interest in pursuing the cases against him.

Whether it is the case of 2005 Stock Exchange swindle, the Pakistan Steels Mills privatization, 2006 sugar scam, financial bungling in multi-billion rupee clean drinking water project, alleged kickbacks in defence procurement including PAF surveillance aircraft deal, the doling out of military land to political leaders and his (Musharraf’s) personal staff, alleged corruption in 2005 earthquake funds, ghost pension scandal, controversial sale of Pakistan’s property in Jakarta, or the unconstitutional appointments made by the dictator, the National Accountability Bureau and the government have closed their eyes on everything even slightly related to Musharraf.

Uniformed Pakistan

Recently, Hamid Mir’s interview with the former President Asif Ali Zardari was taken off air for no reason whatsoever. The sources within the Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority (PEMRA,) on the promise of anonymity, said they didn’t have anything to do with incident. This led Hamid Mir to speculate the hidden forces behind the move and conclude that there is “no difference between Zia’s Pakistan, Musharraf’s Pakistan, and Naya (Khan’s) Pakistan.”

Khan’s decision to make Ijaz Shah the Minister of Interior has also raised a lot of eyebrows, only if there were enough eyebrows for every member of Mushrraf’s cabinet now in Khan’s cabinet. Ijaz Shah, a former spymaster, had always shown keen interest in entering the National Assembly but was defeated and embarrassed every time by PMLN’s Rai Mansab Ali Khan and later his daughter Dr Shizra Mansab. He finally emerged victorious by a narrow margin of 2405 votes after Tehreek-e-Labbaik’s nominee, now nowhere to be found, broke a huge chunk of Dr Shizra’s votes. During Musharraf’s rule, Shah was said to be the main player behind the rigged 2002 election that the Pakistan Muslim League-Q (PMLQ) swept and was said to be Musharraf’s right hand. His name had also appeared in an email of an American friend of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, listing him as an accused along with some others including the then Punjab Chief Minister Pervez Elahi, the then Sindh Chief Minister Arbab Ghulam Rahim, and former ISI chief Hamid Gul as suspects, if she was killed. But none of them were named in the First Information Report or even investigated of Benazir Bhutto’s murder.

Talking a little more about Tehreek-e-Labbaik (TLP’s) short history of existence, the man accused of orchestrating the Faizabad protest Lt Gen Faiz Hameed, which left PMLN’s government embarrassed on all fronts, was recently made the DG of the ISI. The “army-brokered” agreement that finally saw TLP’s crowd dispersing saw Hameed’s signature at the bottom of the agreement, which led the Islamabad High Court to question the jurisdiction of the army in making such an agreement. Justice Shaukat Aziz Siddiqui said that not a single clause of the agreement was according to the law. He later expressed fears that after these remarks, he might be killed or go missing.

Taking in consideration everything the country has been through in only the first year of Khan, it does not take a lot for one to conclude that Pakistan is going through the worst. Thank God our prime minister is handsome, though.

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About the writer: Shahzaib Awan currently heads the Bisouv Publications and House of Entremuse Media Group. He’s an ex-Aitchisonian and is currently studying Computer Science at Jacobs University, Germany.

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Opinion/Writings

Pakistan’s toxic relationship with mullahism

Many argue that mullahism is a school of thought. It maybe, but only in a world where schools encourage violence against those who beg to differ, those who follow another religion, and those who wear jeans.

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Pakistan’s toxic relationship with mullahism

There is no concept of priesthood in Islam. There is no criteria of attire or appearance in Islam. And there is no pass to use the name of God for political, social, or financial gains in Islam. How come, one wonders then, the mullah has crept into the very framework of the constitution of Pakistan, so much so, he has the country by her throat?

“Wear a mask if you have to, but mosques will stay open”

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that the country’s top clerics, holier-than-thou, have refused to close down mosques amid the spread of COVID-19, which has brought the world to her knees – infecting 620,000 and killing 28,000, but why hasn’t the government, one asks himself, rebuffed their imbecile idea?

Mullah school of thought

Many argue that mullahism is a school of thought. It maybe, but only in a world where schools encourage violence against those who beg to differ, those who follow another religion, and those who wear jeans. And a mullah, by definition, is a man who closes his eyes to every atrocity, oppression, and sin in the world except when it causes him discomfort. He is usually identified by his absolute lack of remorse, complete denial of logic, and blind following – not of God, but of those he thinks are closer to God because they wear a beard and abuse the government on live television.

The novel coronavirus

The novel coronavirus is highly contagious and spreads from person to person in close proximity. It has been declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization, which has also asked people to self-isolate in order to halt the spread of the coronavirus. In Pakistan, the coronavirus-related cases have jumped from 7 to 1,408 in mere 19 days and health experts have warned that the cases can top at least 20 million if strict measures aren’t put into place. Although the provincial governments have accelerated their efforts to tackle to the spread of the coronavirus, the center refuses to halt its populist stance.

Bogus party, selection of the most naive

It’s an open secret that Imran Khan could only win the premiership with the help of the invisible force, one of whose election tactics were to establish a bogus far-right political party with so many votes that it wouldn’t win any seats, but would be able to break a decisive section of votes, which would ultimately tilt of the polls in Khan’s Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf’s favor. The tactic worked and we have a puppet for a prime minister. The bogus party, of course, was Khadim Rizvi’s Tehreek-e-Labaik – a circus of mullahs and men alike, chanting the God’s name to open revolt when asked to.

The ‘intelligent’ Muslim world

The Muslim world, the one where there is intelligent life, has closed their mosques for congregational prayers in an attempt to halt the spread of the coronavirus. In Qatar, the mosques have changed the wordings of the call to prayer, in accordance with Islamic values and history, asking the faithful to pray at home. In Palestine, imams have invited doctors and health experts to give the Friday sermons so that they can help the masses by spreading awareness about the invisible enemy. And in Saudi Arabia, home to two of the holiest sites of Islam, the performance of Omra has been temporarily halted, the holy Ka’abah has been temporarily closed for Tawa’afs, the holy Prophet’s mosque has closed its door for the first time in a while, and it has been reported that the yearly Hajj may not happen.

Too many Khans is too many Khans

When a playboy-turned-politician comes into power through religious votes, there is nothing natural about his selection. Khan simply has too many faces to please and too many favors to repay for him to lead the country of this once-in-a-century pandemic. He cannot disappoint the opportunists from Karachi, he cannot disappoint the right or the left, and he cannot disappoint those in Rawalpindi. Khan, undoubtedly one of the most educated, striking, and honest statesman in the country’s history, has projected one too many fronts to belong to any.

On the other end, Chief Minister Murad Ali Shah is making all the headlines Khan should’ve making. Shah, one of Pakistan Peoples Party’s senior-most politicians, has made all the right decisions so far, so much so, he has pretty much saved the country from what could’ve one of its most horrible ends. Shah locked down the country overlooking Khan’s populist sentiments and then he empowered his security forces to enforce them, he made decisive, tough, and striking decisions and was immediately followed in Punjab and Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa – Khan’s strongholds, and most importantly, Shah refused to give one drop of consideration to the mullahs and closed down all mosques and madrasas indefinitely until the end of the pandemic.

Conclusion

All-in-all, if Khan is serious about preventing a blunder, a bloodbath, and a chaos of the highest level, he needs to abandon his alliance with the mullahs and needs to realize that this is not a time to bag votes. The mullahs need to let the reality cascade upon their holier-than-thou-selves and realize that no they are not immune to the novel coronavirus. And the people need to realize that God doesn’t help those who do not help themselves.

To conclude, I would like to narrate Al-Thirmidhi:

“Anas ibn Malik reported: A man sad, “O Messenger of Allah, should I tie my camel and trust in Allah, or should I leave her untied and trust in Allah?” The Prophet, peace and blessings be upon him, said, “Tie her and trust in Allah.””

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Opinion/Writings

Khan’s incompetence is going to cost us a country

Khan needs to realize that the time to act is now and no amount of Nathiagali walks is going to contain the novel coronavirus that has brought the country to a standstill.

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Imran Khan

During his first national address concerning the novel coronavirus, unfortunately-Prime Minister of Pakistan Imran Khan stated that the COVID-19 virus, which has until now, infected 200,000 and killed over 8,000 people worldwide isn’t “serious enough” to lockdown the country.

In his national address, coming weeks late in the first place, Khan absolutely failed to convince the country of the government’s plans and strategies to tackle the novel coronavirus. His unruly, disruptive, and unlike-statesman smirks and expressions, once again, left only his sponsees in awe of him, so much so, the social media erupted in praising the one handsome prime minister this country has ever had. Khan deserves the praise, though, for only his visionary self could apprehend spending Rs42 million of taxpayers’ money for the constitution of a digital media wing at the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, the only responsibility of which is to defend the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) government over the internet and on social media platforms.

As of Wednesday, Pakistan has recorded at least 245 cases of the highly contagious coronavirus – the highest number of confirmed cases in South Asia, compared with 147 in India, 44 in Sri Lanka, and 22 in Afghanistan. Furthermore, NayaDaur, a Pakistani media outlet, has reported that if the government continues doing the bare minimum, which it is, the cases may rise to over 80,000 by mid April.

In mainland China, the coronavirus has infected over 8,500 people and killed 3,248, in Italy, the coronavirus has infected over 35,00 people and killed 2,978, and in Spain, the coronavirus has infected over 17,000 and killed 767. What Khan needs to understand is that Italy, China, and Spain boast some of the world’s best healthcare systems, furthermore, they are top-tier world economies while Pakistan doesn’t even have enough protective kits to equip their doctors with. Khan also needs to understand that the novel coronavirus is highly contagious and that the new cases will rise exponentially, which means, if simply put, that there will be a need for a lot of ICU beds and ventilators that the country doesn’t have. In figures, Pakistan has 0.6 ICU beds available for 1,000 people while China, Italy, and Spain have 4.2, 3.4, and 3.0 beds per 1,000 people respectively. What Khan needs to understand is that if the government doesn’t take decisive measures now, it will be too late.

Khan refuses to halt his populist stance, so much so, he refuses to visit anywhere without having at least a dozen photographers following him. In a video that Khan posted on his social media profiles, he can be seen observing the state of a quarantine center in DG Khan inquiring about the patients’ health, to which, of course, the patients, or so, answer in all-praises for the management – in this case the PTI’s Punjab government. The patients sing Khan’s name and throw their support behind him to conclude what seemed like a textbook scripted PR stunt. But God works in mysterious ways for the points that the video had scored the Punjab government were quickly balanced out by Sardar Usman Buzdar who, shockingly, is also the ‘Chief Minister’ of the province. According to a Pakistani media outlet Dawn, which also happens to be the country’s oldest and most reliable English newspaper, Buzdar asked such an innocent question that it rocked, rather sunk, the very idea of him leading the fight against the coronavirus. Dawn reported the incident as follows:

“A few days ago Punjab Chief Minister Usman Buzdar received a detailed briefing on coronavirus from relevant experts and officials. The purpose was to provide him all the information he required as the chief executive of the largest province, so he could make the right decisions. At the end of the briefing, the chief minister asked a question innocently: ”Yeh corona kaat-ta kaisay hai?” (how does this corona bite?)”

On the other side of the country, Chief Minister Sindh Murad Ali Shah is leading the country’s fight against the vicious virus. Shah, 57, holds two masters degrees from Stanford University and is concluded in the list of Pakistan Peoples Party’s (PPP) most senior politicians and figures. Shah’s plan is simple: halt the spread of the coronavirus as soon as possible, quarantine all those showing severe symptoms, provide for the families of those quarantined, and isolate and test all those returning home from countries with the most coronavirus cases. To implement his plan, Shah ordered the closure of all educational institutions when the very first coronavirus case was confirmed in Sindh. Later, he ordered to shut down all public monuments, parks, offices, restaurants, beaches, and shopping malls. He set up a 10,000-bed hospital in Karachi, a 2000-bed hospital in Sukker, and isolation centers in all districts of Sindh. Furthermore, he has been thorough in reporting cases, spreading awareness, and containing panic by holding press conferences almost every other day. Shah’s plan has worked out so well that even the World Health Organization (WHO) has applauded his efforts calling his work “the best after (that of) China’s.”

Khan’s team lacks greatly what Shah’s team is doing so wonderfully well, but he still refuses to acknowledge it, so much so, not once has he passed any positive comments Shah’s way nor is he committed to consider Shah’s many suggestions any seriously than he would take anyone’s not wearing boots to go with their suits. Khan is stubborn, weak, and controlled by one too many fronts and so, it is our duty, as citizens of this great country, to question his policies, grudges, politics, and decisions for we have voted him into the office he’s not working hard enough to keep. It is our duty as brothers, sisters, fathers, mothers, sons, and daughters to make sure our loved ones are taken care of in this testing time. And it is our duty as daily workers, housewives, doctors, and students to fight for our right of survival.

Khan needs to realize that he is the prime minister of not only Punjab and Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa, but also of Sindh, Balochistan, Kashmir, and Gilgil-Baltistan. Khan needs to realize that the country can only survive this pandemic if it projects a common front, defended equally by all parties of all provinces. And Khan needs to realize that the time to act is now and no amount of Nathiagali walks is going to contain the novel coronavirus that has brought the country to a standstill.

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Opinion/Writings

Person of the Decade – Raheel Sharif

Bisouv, in its first public issue, salutes the many achievements of the former Chief of Army Staff Raheel Sharif.

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Raheel Sharif

Through storms of political biases, domestic and foreign insurgencies, and financial and social emergencies, Pakistan has emerged – every time a little stronger. And the people responsible for putting the country in these desperate of situations are plenty and the people responsible for taking the country out of them are, but a few. Bisouv, in its first ever public issue, salutes the latter and in this article, celebrates one of the few – Raheel Sharif.

Currently serving as the first Commander-in-Chief of the Islamic Military Counter Terrorism Coalition, a 39-nation alliance of Muslim countries headquartered in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Raheel Sharif, a former four-star general and Chief of Army Staff (COAS) is arguably the most popular COAS in Pakistan’s history. Born in a country, in which to this day all shots are called, directly or in a de-facto martial law-style, by the military, Raheel Sharif was different – a general who ‘could,’ but never did.

MORE FROM THIS WEEK’S ISSUE: Blinding Justice and a Case of Uniforms

Under his command, the Pakistan Army carried out fierce anti-terrorism operations in North Waziristan in the Operation Zarb-e-Azb, which not only stabilized the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA,) but built the foundation for the government of Pakistan to merge the deprived province into Khyber Pakhtoonkhwa (KP.) Sharif was responsible for expanding the role of paramilitaries, mainly Pakistan Rangers, in the coastal city of Karachi – a move that saw an exceptional decrease in the crime rate in the city and later pulled out the city’s name out of the ‘Most Dangerous Cities in the World’ list. Unlike his predecessors, Sharif wholeheartedly supported the democratically elected government in the deprived, and the largest province of Pakistan, Balochistan and buried the hatred that former dictator Musharraf first initiated in 2006. At the request of the Chinese government and after the Pakistan government’s approval, Sharif created a new brigade-level military unit to help protect and secure the many projects under the Pakistan-China Economic Corridor (CPEC.) Sharif also helped develop Pakistan’s indigenous defence industry, which resulted in the savings of more than $1.14 billion, over a year and half time period

In other feats, under Raheel Sharif, the Pakistan Army operated strictly under its constituted jurisdiction and left foreign, social, and economic policies to the democratically elected civilian government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif. Under his tenure, Pakistan Army carried out first ever joint military exercises with Russia and supported the government deepen relations with China.

MORE FROM THIS ISSUE: Once a city of gardens, Lahore is now a concrete jungle

Reportedy, Sharif also thwarted a coup attempt in 2014. As disclosed by former United States ambassador to Pakistan Richard Olsen, former head of Pakistan Intelligence Service ISI Zahir-ul-Islam was mobilizing for a coup in September of 2014 during Imran Khan’s infamous Islamabad protest that lasted for months.

“We received information that Zahir-ul-Islam, the DG ISI, was mobilizing for a coup in September of 2014 [during Khan’s protest in Islamabad.] [Army Chief] Raheel [Sharif] blocked it by, in effect, removing Zahir, by announcing his successor,” Olson was quoted in the recently launched book ‘The Battle For Pakistan, The Bitter US Friendship and a Tough Neighborhood’ by Shuja Nawaz in its chapter titling, Mil-to-Mil Relations: Do More. “[Zahir] was talking to the corps commanders and was talking to likeminded army officers… He was prepared to do it and had the chief [Raheel Sharif] been willing, even tacitly, it would have happened. But the chief was not willing, so it didn’t happen.”

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